MSU Denver at DIME Denver – Bachelor of Arts in Music: Commercial Music Performance – Vocals

  • Degree duration: 4 years (full-time)
  • DIME Denver Phone: +1 (303) 623 1600
  • DIME Denver Email: [email protected]

Introduction

The Bachelor of Arts in Music: Commercial Music Performance degree provides you with an opportunity to specialize in vocals. It aims to empower you with a high level of instrumental skill and the ability to develop an authoritative, individual approach to the performance and creation of music. On completion of the degree, you will have established a varied portfolio of creative work and have an understanding of how to develop your own unique approach to your specialism and the wider industry.

Studying for your degree at MSU Denver at DIME Denver means you will be singing everyday for the duration of your studies. We recognize that if you want to compete as a vocalist and be the best that you can be, you will need intensive instruction along with the time to practice and develop your technique and your own style, and to form a realistic and achievable career plan. This degree is for vocalists who are serious about their music and focused on a career in today’s fast-paced and ever-changing music business environment. You will study in a vocal group for most of your classes, and in mixed discipline groups for performance, music theory, and music business courses.

What you’ll do

For more information, visit MSU Denver’s website or explore the courses by clicking on the sections below:

Year 1: Semester 1

Essential Music Theory Skills
MUS 1010 – This course covers the techniques of music reading, analysis, and hearing skills by teaching the fundamental principles of meter, rhythm, pitch scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, seventh chords and the keyboard. The application of traditional sight-reading and ear-training are emphasized. This course is designed to prepare music majors, musical theatre majors, and music minors for MUS 1110.
Techniques and Improvisation I
MUS 1846 – This class will provide students the opportunity to build a solid foundation of facility on their chosen instrument. This will involve a logical progression of exercises and application. Students will additionally be challenged to experiment with basic techniques to begin to develop a creative approach to improvisation. The class will situate technical vocabulary and improvisational skills within a variety of musical contexts across numerous genres. Along the way, students will develop a comprehensive method for practicing productively, keeping track of their own progress as they critically reflect on it. Group lectures will be enhanced with masterclasses and opportunities for one-on-one tutorial sessions.
Pre-Production
MUS 1858 – This class is a forum to work in instrumental specialist groups (guitar, bass, drums, vocals) to dissect, analyze, and learn the particular technical aspects of the Live Performance Workshop song for any given week. Students may be asked to create scratch charts for songs, learn passages by ear, and demonstrate a rage of techniques and skills to perform a particular song with musical authenticity and accuracy.
Live Performance Workshop
MUS 1840 – This class is all about preparing to play live on stage with pro gear to the highest professional standards. Students will first do pre-production on their individual instrument in which a song’s technique, tone, feel, and arrangement will be broken down and analyzed in detail. After some individual practicing, students will perform in various live group sessions in which musical communication, performance ability, and stage presence will be molded by instructors who will provide feedback.
Recital Attendance
MUS 0020 – Students must attend a total of twelve performances selected from a list of approved performances provided at the beginning of each semester. Students must enroll during each semester of individual instruction, and must receive a “Satisfactory” grade in order to progress to the next Techniques and Improvisation level.
Introduction to Music
MUS 1000 – This course will investigate the function, structure, style, genre classifications, and aesthetic interpretations of a diverse variety of musical traditions. The student will develop and employ a vocabulary for musical description and listen to many different traditions of musical expression.
Public Speaking
SPE 1010 – This course integrates both the theory and practical skills of topic research, composition, delivery, and criticism of public speaking. Skill development includes effective public presentation strategies and audience analysis. Students develop critical listening skills by evaluating their own public-speaking style, as well as the effectiveness of their peers and professional speakers. This course builds public-speaking confidence, and introduces the student to the power of public rhetoric in social and professional contexts.

Year 1: Semester 2

Music Theory I
MUS 1110 – This course is the study of the melodic, harmonic, rhythm, textural, and formal elements of music through analysis and composition and the development of reading and hearing skills as they relate to these elements. It covers diatonic music based on the triad including tonic and dominant harmony, phrase structure and grouping, and melodic figuration and dissonance. Aural recognition of materials is emphasized.
Music Theory I Lab
MUS 1120 – Students will apply reading and listening skills to the melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, textural, and formal elements of music through singing and the use of the keyboard. This course covers diatonic music based on the triad.
Techniques and Improvisation II
MUS 1848 – This class will build directly on the previous semester’s iteration of this course, providing students an opportunity to further develop a solid foundation of facility on their chosen instrument. This will involve a logical progression of exercises and application. Students will continue to experiment with basic techniques to further develop a creative approach to improvisation. The class will situate technical vocabulary and improvisational skills within a variety of musical contexts across numerous genres. Along the way, students will continue to develop a comprehensive method for practicing productively, keeping track of their own progress as they critically reflect on it. Group lectures will be enhanced with masterclasses and opportunities for one-on-one tutorial sessions.
Pre-Production
MUS 1858 – This class is a forum to work in instrumental specialist groups (guitar, bass, drums, vocals) to dissect, analyze, and learn the particular technical aspects of the Live Performance Workshop song for any given week. Students may be asked to create scratch charts for songs, learn passages by ear, and demonstrate a rage of techniques and skills to perform a particular song with musical authenticity and accuracy.
Live Performance Workshop
MUS 1840 – This class is all about preparing to play live on stage with pro gear to the highest professional standards. Students will first do pre-production on their individual instrument in which a song’s technique, tone, feel, and arrangement will be broken down and analyzed in detail. After some individual practicing, students will perform in various live group sessions in which musical communication, performance ability, and sound design will be molded by instructors who will provide feedback.
Class Piano I
MUS 161B – This course offers class instruction in piano to students with little or no previous training. You will learn the basics of playing scales and chords along with simple etudes and accompaniment for voice and other instruments.
Recital Attendance
MUS 0020 – Students must attend a total of twelve performances selected from a list of approved performances provided at the beginning of each semester. Students must enroll during each semester of individual instruction, and must receive a “Satisfactory” grade in order to progress to the next Techniques and Improvisation level.
Mathematical Modes of Thought
MTH 1080 – This course is an introduction to the spirit and methods of mathematics. It includes problem-solving strategies, introductory financial mathematics, probability, statistics, and other topics demonstrating the interdisciplinary applicability of mathematics.
Composing Arguments
ENG 1010 – Composing Arguments is a course focusing on the process of writing and revising college level texts in three major categories: arguments through-personal reflection, arguments through analysis, and arguments through interpretation. The course employs lecture, discussion, workshop, and conference methods. Students learn how to read, summarize, and analyze texts. Students demonstrate their ability to generate, organize, and produce writing for appropriate audiences. Course work does not include research and documentation of secondary sources. Students must receive a C- or better to earn course credit.

Year 2: Semester 1

Music Theory II
MUS 1130 – This course is the continuation of Music Theory I. It includes the study of the melodic, harmonic, rhythmic, textural, and formal dements of music through analysis and composition and the development of reading and hearing skills as they relate to these elements. It covers predominant chords and other diatonic chords, seventh chords, harmonic sequences, and an introduction to tonicization and modulation. Aural recognition of materials is emphasized.
Music Theory II Lab
MUS 1140 – This course is a continuation of Music Theory I Lab,and covers diatonic seventh chords and elementary chromaticism.
Session Styles I
MUS 2840 – This course will require that students perform a diverse range of contemporary and classic musical styles in the popular idiom to high standards in preparation to become working session musicians. Students will be required to listen to and analyze a range of recordings to assess their stylistic qualities and nuances; this will include transcription and score analysis. Instructors will provide historical and cultural context for each style as well as performance training and guidance in critical listening skills. Students will be required to read charts as well as play by ear while performing in various styles/genres. Group sessions will be discipline-specific, and be supported by one-on-one tutorials and masterclasses.
Intermediate Techniques and Improvisation I
MUS 2846 – Building on year one of Technique and Improvisation, this class will provide students with the opportunity to further develop facility on their chosen instrument. This will involve a logical progression of exercises and application. Students will additionally be challenged to experiment with intermediate level techniques to further develop a creative approach to improvisation. The class will situate technical vocabulary and improvisational skills within a variety of musical contexts across numerous genres. Along the way, students will develop a comprehensive method for practicing productively, keeping track of their own progress as they critically reflect on it. Group lectures will be enhanced with masterclasses and opportunities for one-on-one tutorial sessions.
Artist Inquiry I
MUS 1850 – In this class, students will study the particular techniques, styles, repertoire, and sounds of artists within their proper historical, cultural, and social contexts. This course will outline a basic chronological history of American popular music with an emphasis on rock ’n’ roll (broadly conceived). Each week instructors will provide a lecture on a particular time period and/or topic, and then guide a student performance of a song in that historical idiom (Motown, surf rock, folk, rockabilly, etc.). Students will choose two artists to study in-depth that relate directly to the topics and time periods covered in class. They will be responsible for emulating the style and sound of their chosen artists through performance; additionally, students will be required to conduct library research to produce a critical essay examining these artists in relation to their historical, social, and cultural context.
Large Ensemble (Pop and Soul Choir)
MUS 3810 – The ability to blend voices while singing in a group is an essential skill for any contemporary vocalist. Working to enhance such abilities, this mixed chorus of men and women will focus on a diverse and challenging repertoire of classic and contemporary popular music. Given Denver’s rich history in soul and gospel music, this class will focus heavily on these genres to prepare students for the types of gigs they are likely to encounter in their immediate market. Students will learn to sing precisely and authentically, expressing lyrics and emotion appropriately for each song. The choir will perform both a cappella and accompanied arrangements. Repertoire will vary from semester to semester and be primarily chosen by the instructor, although students are encouraged to offer suggestions and bring their original work or arrangements of covers to the group. Professionalism, musicianship, creativity, vocal technique, and group cohesion will be emphasized throughout the semester. Student participation is key, and will be assessed weekly; a final performance will be mandatory for all students to pass this class.
Recital Attendance
MUS 0020 – Students must attend a total of twelve performances selected from a list of approved performances provided at the beginning of each semester. Students must enroll during each semester of individual instruction, and must receive a “Satisfactory” grade in order to progress to the next Techniques and Improvisation level.
Freshman Composition
ENG 1020 – This is a course in the process of writing extended essays supported by research. The course includes an introduction to library use, research techniques, and the conventions of MLA and APA styles of documentation, as well as practice in critical reading, thinking, and writing across the disciplines. Students can expect to do a series of shorter writing and research assignments leading to the longer, documented paper. Freshman Composition includes hands-on instruction in the use of computers in research and writing in a computer lab.

Year 2: Semester 2

Session Styles II
MUS 2842 – Continuing from the previous semester of this class, this course will require that students perform a diverse range of contemporary and classic musical styles in the popular idiom to high standards in preparation to become working session musicians. Students will be required to listen to and analyze a range of recordings to assess their stylistic qualities and nuances; this will include transcription and score analysis. Instructors will provide historical and cultural context for each style as well as performance training and guidance in critical listening skills. Students will be required to read charts as well as play by ear while performing in various styles/genres. Group sessions will be discipline-specific, and be supported by one-on-one tutorials and master classes.
Intermediate Techniques and Improvisation II
MUS 2848 – This class will build directly on the previous semester’s iteration of this course, providing students an opportunity to further develop a deeper facility on their chosen instrument. This will involve a logical progression of exercises and application. Students will continue to experiment with intermediate level techniques to further develop a creative approach to improvisation. The class will situate technical vocabulary and improvisational skills within a variety of musical contexts across numerous genres. Along the way, students will continue to develop a comprehensive method for practicing productively, keeping track of their own progress as they critically reflect on it. Group lectures will be enhanced with masterclasses and opportunities for one-on-one tutorial sessions.
Artist Inquiry II
MUS 1852 – Picking up chronologically where the previous semester of this class left off, this course allows students to continue to study the particular techniques, styles, repertoire, and sounds of artists within their proper historical, cultural, and social contexts. This course will continue to outline a basic chronological history of American popular music with an emphasis on rock ’n’ roll (broadly conceived). Each week instructors will provide a lecture on a particular time period and/or topic, and then guide a student performance of a song in that historical idiom (disco, techno, nu-metal, hip-hop, etc.). Students will choose two artists to study in-depth that relate directly to the topics and time periods covered in class. They will be responsible for emulating the style and sound of their chosen artists through performance; additionally, students will be required to conduct library research to produce a critical essay examining these artists in relation to their historical, social, and cultural context.
African Drum Ensemble
MUS 3810 – This ensemble will focus on the music of West Africa and the African diaspora, particularly the Caribbean. Students will gain experience performing a diverse repertoire that includes musical practices such as: call-and-response, hocket, polyrhythm, drum language, parallel vocal harmony, and more. Students will be expected to attend rehearsal sessions as well as several public performances throughout the term. Students will also be expected to articulate an understanding of this music in its proper cultural, social, and historical context. The repertoire for this ensemble will vary, so that students who enroll in the class multiple times will continue to increase their knowledge and skills.
Recital Attendance
MUS 0020 – Students must attend a total of twelve performances selected from a list of approved performances provided at the beginning of each semester. Students must enroll during each semester of individual instruction, and must receive a “Satisfactory” grade in order to progress to the next Techniques and Improvisation level.
World History Since 1500
HIST 1040 – This course provides an introduction to important theories, concepts, methods and content for understanding world history since 1500. Among others, it explores social, cultural, religious, economic, and political themes.
Art and Visual Literacy
ARTH 1500 – This course is a general introduction to the tools and methods used to analyze and interpret works of art in a variety of contexts. Students learn how to effectively communicate how visual forms work in conjunction with cultural beliefs both in the past and present. Analytical tools appropriate to the disciplines of art criticism and art history, including the use of research, are used by the student to support interpretations. A variety of artistic traditions, including materials and techniques from across the globe and throughout time, are introduced so that students are prepared to identify and interpret historical and contemporary examples of visual art and design. By developing an awareness of the relationship between visual forms and the messages they convey, students increase their ability to respond critically to their own increasingly complex, visual environment. This course is designed for the non-major and recommended for the General Studies requirement in Arts and Humanities.

Year 3: Semester 1

Advanced Techniques and Improvisation I
MUS 3846 – Building on Intermediate Technique and Improvisation, this class will provide students with the opportunity to further develop facility on their chosen instrument. This will involve a logical progression of exercises and application. Students will additionally be challenged to experiment with advanced level techniques to further develop a creative approach to improvisation. The class will situate technical vocabulary and improvisational skills within a variety of musical contexts across numerous genres. Along the way, students will develop a comprehensive method for practicing productively, keeping track of their own progress as they critically reflect on it. Group lectures will be enhanced with masterclasses and opportunities for one-on-one tutorial sessions.
Musics of the World
MUS 3050 – The course will explore the diverse forms of musical expression found in within cultures from around the world. In addition to surveying a variety of musical practices, aesthetic systems, and functions of music, the fundamental theoretical approaches of ethnomusicology will be introduced and employed.
Group Recital
MUS 3878 – Building on Live Performance Workshop, this class takes a more advanced approach to live performance. While continuing to develop technical and improvisational skills on their chosen instrument, students will develop their skills as Musical Directors as they form and manage their own ensembles. Students will choose repertoire as they cultivate a group sound and personality. Faculty will be on hand to offer feedback and constructive guidance to help mold a band into a cohesive professional unit. Various faculty members will be assigned to each group as mentors. Each ensemble will be responsible for constructing and performing a 40-minute set for an audience of their peers and instructors, receiving feedback from both. Students will be required to consider lighting, sound design, staging, audience interaction, promotion, and other elements of constructing a professional performance to a high standard.
Domestic Music Market
MUS 3890 – This course provides students with an introductory overview of the American music industry. Throughout the semester this class will demonstrate how the multiple components of the music business – management, fundraising, publishing, copyright, contracts, touring, promotions, merchandising/ endorsements, corporate sponsorship, film, new media, etc. – all work together in the digital age to create income streams for artists and industry professionals. Students will study the business strategies of classic and contemporary artists to reveal how these musicians have navigated an increasingly complex and dynamic industry. Through case study analysis, students will deconstruct the careers of successful artists to show how the many parts of the music business complement and compete with one another. Overall, this course gives students the tools to negotiate the complex terrain of the domestic music market.
Ensemble
MUS 3810 – This course is a continuation of MUS 2810 and is designed to explore and study performance techniques through the rehearsal and performance of standard ensemble literature. Ensembles may also serve as reading labs for conducting classes. This course may be repeated for credit.
Recital Attendance
MUS 0020 – Students must attend a total of twelve performances selected from a list of approved performances provided at the beginning of each semester. Students must enroll during each semester of individual instruction, and must receive a “Satisfactory” grade in order to progress to the next Techniques and Improvisation level.
Introduction to Nutrition
NUT 2040 – This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the fundamental concepts of human nutrition, including digestion, absorption, metabolism, and function of nutrients as they relate to human health and disease.

Year 3: Semester 2

Advanced Techniques and Improvisation II
MUS 3848 – Building on Intermediate Technique and Improvisation, this class will provide students with the opportunity to further develop facility on their chosen instrument. This will involve a logical progression of exercises and application. Students will additionally be challenged to experiment with advanced level techniques to further develop a creative approach to improvisation. The class will situate technical vocabulary and improvisational skills within a variety of musical contexts across numerous genres. Along the way, students will develop a comprehensive method for practicing productively, keeping track of their own progress as they critically reflect on it. Group lectures will be enhanced with masterclasses and opportunities for one-on-one tutorial sessions.
Group Recital
MUS 3878 – Building on Live Performance Workshop, this class takes a more advanced approach to live performance. While continuing to develop technical and improvisational skills on their chosen instrument, students will develop their skills as Musical Directors as they form and manage their own ensembles. Students will choose repertoire as they cultivate a group sound and personality. Faculty will be on hand to offer feedback and constructive guidance to help mold a band into a cohesive professional unit. Various faculty members will be assigned to each group as mentors. Each ensemble will be responsible for constructing and performing a 40-minute set for an audience of their peers and instructors, receiving feedback from both. Students will be required to consider lighting, sound design, staging, audience interaction, promotion, and other elements of constructing a professional performance to a high standard.
Jazz Styles
MUS 3020 – This class explores the history of Jazz within the context of the African American cultural experience. The course will examine African musical aesthetics that are at the core of all forms of jazz throughout its history. The evolution of jazz will be traced, beginning with distinctly African American musical expressions such as minstrelsy, the blues, and ragtime, before surveying the developments and prominent figures of jazz in the 20th century including New Orleans and classic jazz, bebop and related movements, the innovations of Coleman and Taylor, the innovations of Miles Davis, and the jazz styles of the present.
Ensemble
MUS 3810 – This course is a continuation of MUS 2810 and is designed to explore and study performance techniques through the rehearsal and performance of standard ensemble literature. Ensembles may also serve as reading labs for conducting classes. This course may be repeated for credit.
Recital Attendance
MUS 0020 – Students must attend a total of twelve performances selected from a list of approved performances provided at the beginning of each semester. Students must enroll during each semester of individual instruction, and must receive a “Satisfactory” grade in order to progress to the next Techniques and Improvisation level.
Staging Cultures
THE 3213 – This course uses theatre history and dramatic texts to explore cultures of previously and/or presently marginalized peoples, including but not limited to African Americans, Hispanics, Asian Americans, women, and the GLBTQ community, in order to promote greater understanding of these peoples and their struggles for representation.
Introduction to Journalism and Mass Media
JRN 1010 – This survey course introduces students from all academic disciplines to the historical development of journalism and mass media and its relationship to contemporary society. Students will explore the functions and impact of newspapers, books, television, radio, magazines, films, public relations and issues such as technology convergence, censorship, economic control, and privacy.

Year 4: Semester 1

Personal Expression
MUS 4848 – This class will require that students combine all the technical facility and improvisational abilities learned throughout the degree thus far, applying their knowledge and skills towards the development of their own unique sound and style. Students must demonstrate, through performance and written work, a unique and innovative approach to their chosen discipline. Students will critically reflect on their own artistic development, situating their own style vis-à-vis previous and contemporary musicians and other artists. Students will be required to perform a range of original and/or preexisting repertoire that highlights their unique approach to their instrument. They will also be asked to write a reflective essay to examine their work in musical detail as it connects their artistry to their social and/or political context. Instrument-specific sessions will be supported with individual tutorials and masterclasses.
Techniques Practicum
MUS 4844 – In this class, students will learn to perform extended techniques that push the boundaries of their instrument and move students closer to becoming complete virtuosos in their craft.
Commercial Composition and Arrangement
MUS 3850 – This course will require that students study and apply techniques, methodologies, and concepts for composing and arranging original music. Students will be given specific prompts to inspire and guide their songwriting. Students will also analyze classic and contemporary songs and arrangements, including score analysis and critical listening assessments. Students will be required to compose original pieces of music as well as create original arrangements of preexisting material. Additionally, students will be asked to critically reflect on their compositional process. This course will combine performance majors into one instructional group, and encourage collaboration as well as independent work to reflect the realities of the contemporary songwriting industry.
DIME Elective
XXX XXXX – Students will be able to choose from a selection of core courses in other disciplines (i.e., songwriting, music entrepreneurship) as well as a rotating group of offerings that may include: Home Recording, Live Sound, Denver Music Heritage, Guitar Ensemble, Pop Music & Politics, Stage Management, and more!
Ensemble
MUS 3810 – This course is a continuation of MUS 2810 and is designed to explore and study performance techniques through the rehearsal and performance of standard ensemble literature. Ensembles may also serve as reading labs for conducting classes. This course may be repeated for credit.
Recital Attendance
MUS 0020 – Students must attend a total of twelve performances selected from a list of approved performances provided at the beginning of each semester. Students must enroll during each semester of individual instruction, and must receive a “Satisfactory” grade in order to progress to the next Techniques and Improvisation level.
Sound and Music
PHY 3620 – This course will consider the basic nature of sound waves, the ear and hearing, musical instruments, and acoustics. Although this course is mainly descriptive, some high school algebra will be used.

Year 4: Semester 2

Senior Recital
MUS 4840 – This course is a continuation of Performance VII (Primary Performance Area) and is only for students majoring in music performance. It covers individual instruction in voice, guitar, bass, and drums. It includes required weekly attendance at a one-hour performance class in the area of study in which students perform for one another. During the semester, the student will perform a 50-minute Senior Recital that must be approved by the process specified on the Senior Recital Hearing Request form.
Professional Performance Capstone
MUS 4890 – The Professional Practice Portfolio course requires you to research and report on the full spectrum of career opportunities available within your specialist area. In addition to identifying various career pathways, you should also comment on how your craft can be contextualized into professional opportunities that will, if desired, monetize your skills and inspire entrepreneurial practice and artistic excellence. Additionally, you will be asked to have other components in your Portfolio that are intended to facilitate your career. These items include:

• Personal website (supporting your professional work)
• Various forms of social media (as above)

You should utilize a research-based approach (clearly demonstrated through referenced sources) to identify career and/or artist opportunities related to your specialist area, and support findings by examining the work of recognized leaders in their field. The report should examine current ways of working for the self-employed music professional, including entrepreneurial practice, marketing, self-promotion and multiple income streams. This will involve both qualitative ethnographic methods and quantitative analysis of data collected. Signpost lectures, given by the Head of Education, will address such methodologies and their implementation; additionally, you may schedule an individual tutorial with the Head of Education to discuss academic research practices and expectations.

You will be required to present a persuasive argument showing how your aims are realistic and achievable; this should be backed up by credible research data and analysis. Where possible, the additional components of your portfolio should align with your report on career opportunities and pathways.

You will be expected to develop a strategic approach for managing the process of creating the portfolio that employs effective time management, research skills and the ability to reflect and comment critically. Lecture content will be supported with tutorials and group seminars.

DIME Elective
XXX XXXX – Students will be able to choose from a selection of core courses in other disciplines (i.e., songwriting, music entrepreneurship) as well as a rotating group of offerings that may include: Home Recording, Live Sound, Denver Music Heritage, Guitar Ensemble, Pop Music & Politics, Stage Management, and more!
DIME Elective
XXX XXXX – Students will be able to choose from a selection of core courses in other disciplines (i.e., songwriting, music entrepreneurship) as well as a rotating group of offerings that may include: Home Recording, Live Sound, Denver Music Heritage, Guitar Ensemble, Pop Music & Politics, Stage Management, and more!
Recital Attendance
MUS 0020 – Students must attend a total of twelve performances selected from a list of approved performances provided at the beginning of each semester. Students must enroll during each semester of individual instruction, and must receive a “Satisfactory” grade in order to progress to the next Techniques and Improvisation level.
Marketing Around the Globe
MKT 2010 – Students study the importance of globalization in the business world where global markets are more connected and marketers must respond to the expectations of global consumers. The course covers the essential concepts of global marketing with the aid of extensive, real-life examples. The course offers balanced coverage of developed and developing markets. Integrating cultural analysis throughout the course, students examine global and local competition and forms of global market entry, as well as basic principles of global marketing strategies, such as price, product, distribution, and promotion.